Coconut Aminos Amigos

A soylike sauce without the soy for the Paleo crowd

Instead of soy sauce try coconut aminos
Coconut aminos: Our new favorite flavor-boosting condiment.

Updated Jul 4, 2017 @ 11:32 am

Prepare to clear a space in your fridge door: It’s time to meet coconut aminos.

With its dark hue, rich fermented flavor and deeply salty tang, this condiment could easily fool you into thinking it was soy sauce. But while traditional soy sauce is brewed from boiled soybeans, salt and roasted grains like wheat, coconut aminos are fermented from the raw sap of the coconut tree and unrefined sea salt. The gluten and MSG-free sauce has 65% less sodium per serving than soy, is low-glycemic and contains a broad-spectrum of amino acids, natural minerals and vitamins B and C, while still packing that desirable umami punch.

While wheat-free tamari has long been the darling of the healthy-eating scene, it still contains soy; ditto for the ever-popular Bragg’s Aminos. With non-organic and genetically modified soybeans rampant and soy and wheat allergies on the rise, using coconut aminos is a smart swap that’s as easy as replacing one glass bottle with another. It’s no wonder that coconut aminos have also become a favorite staple among Paleo folks.

Aaron Birk, the Content Manager for Ultimate Superfoods, Inc., which makes Organic Ojio Aminos ($8) told us, “Our aminos are age fermented like wine. This ferments them without being acid-hydrolyzed as many common soy sauces are. Hydrolyzing soy protein creates MSG, which many choose to avoid.” Another widely available brand to look for is Coconut Secret Coconut Aminos ($6.85).

Coconut aminos are an equal opportunity condiment—try it on your vegan brown rice bowl with avocado slices, dashed over heirloom tomatoes in the summer, in salad dressing or as part of the secret sauce for your homemade Paleo beef jerky. And of course, it can be used anywhere you would normally reach for soy sauce or tamari.

Isn’t it time to go look for a spot in your fridge?