Sprouted Grains Gain

Ever wonder what sprouted grains are and why they're good for you? Read on...

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Sprouted grains are great to incorporate into your diet
Do carbs right by choosing sprouted grains—like the wheat pictured here.

Updated Jul 2, 2017 @ 8:25 am

Wanna make the most of those whole grains in your diet? Go sprouted.

Chances are, you’ve already tried one of the many popular sprouted breads on the market today, like two of our favorite brands Alvarado Street Bakery and Ezekiel 4:9, made with sprouted wheat berries, sprouted barley, sprouted spelt and more.

But do you know why these sprouted grains are so good for you?

Turns out that sprouting grains unlocks their nutrition, increasing the levels of vitamin C, folate, fiber and more that your body can absorb from them. It also makes grains easier to digest for those with sensitivities to grain proteins like gluten.

And quick science lesson: sprouting happens when whole grains are soaked until they begin to germinate so that a small sprout pokes out from the grain seed.

You can expand your repertoire beyond bread by sprouting grains at home, including brown rice, quinoa and oats. Just rinse and soak them in water—leave them in a bowl on the counter covered overnight before cooking as usual.

If you’re not up for sprouting your own grains, you can still enjoy flours and many other products made from sprouted grains—like pastas, chips and even cookies.

And remember while sprouted breads are considered “flourless,” since they are made with milled sprouted grains rather than with traditional flour, that doesn’t mean they are gluten free. If you are allergic to wheat or gluten, continue to steer clear of these products.

For a homemade taste of sprouted grains, try this deluxe pancake recipe.

Sprouted Coconut Pancakes

  • Serves: 4
  • Prep Time:
  • Cook Time:
  • PRINT Print This Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 pasture-raised eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups organic coconut milk
  • 3 tablespoons organic coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup pure Grade B maple syrup (plus more for on top)
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/4 cups sprouted whole wheat or spelt flour
  • 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 4 tablespoons pasture-raised butter (for pan and topping)

Directions

  1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk eggs and continue whisking in milk, oil, syrup and vanilla.
  2. Add dry ingredients to the wet mixture and whisk all together.
  3. Heat a heavy frying pan, greased with a little pasture-raised butter. When pan is hot, pour 1/4 cup of batter onto the pan.
  4. When bubbles appear on the surface, about two minutes, flip the pancake and cook the other side for another two minutes or until center of pancake is cooked.
  5. Serve with butter and maple syrup.