Baby got flat

Sprouted grains: our new go-to

Dough made with sprouted grain
Put your Thanksgiving leftovers on a sprouted grain Flatzza. Voila. It's pizza night.

Updated Sep 13, 2016 @ 10:49 am

Talking about bread (and especially gluten) these days is a straight-up quagmire. But we’re not ones to ever shy away from a good conversation about food.

These days, when we reach for a slice of bread, we try to make sure it’s made with sprouted grains, meaning that it has boosted nutrition. Sprouted grains by nature are lower in carbs and calories, and higher in protein and fiber than traditional flour-based breads.

Now with the introduction of Angelic Bakehouse’s Flatzza ($6), we can also reach for this super-versatile sprouted grain flatbread as a base for open face sandwiches or homemade pizza. The thin, circular bread is made using only non-GMO ingredients like sprouted quinoa, barley and amaranath with American honey and no artificial sweeteners, fats or preservatives.

Sprouted wheat
Non-sprouted vs. sprouted wheat. Sprouted grains are lower in carbs and calories, and higher in protein and fiber.

Husband and wife team Jenny and James Marino bought the Milwaukee-based bakery five years ago and gave the company a total rebranding. Jenny says, “The masses were just starting to wake up to the benefits of sprouted grain. Knowing this, we bet the farm on sprouted and discontinued all other lines, choosing to focus on doing one thing and doing it really well.”

And that they do. Angelic is one of the few commercial bakeries in the USA that sprout all of their grains in-house, and gently grinds the fresh sprouts straight into the dough—rather than drying or milling them into flour. Even better, Angelic Bakehouse’s products can easily be found all over the country at stores like Whole Foods and Sprouts Farmers Market.

If your turkey is still lingering, the Marinos’ recipe for Thanksgiving leftover pizza is a compelling reason to pick up a pack of Flatzzas—either online or in a store near you.