No Goat Left Behind: Goatober

Heritage Foods USA's new movement

Goat in a field
October is now "Goatober!"

Updated Jul 11, 2017 @ 11:34 am

In case you haven’t heard, goat is the new black. As part of their No Goat Left Behind initiative, Heritage Foods USA is dubbing the month of October “Goatober,” with a pledge to sell 500 bucklings to restaurants and their mail order base. Which begs the question: Why goat?

  1. It’s Less Wasteful
    U.S. farmers currently kill many male goats at birth, or sell them into the commodity market, because they can’t afford to raise them. (Why pick on the males? Because farmers use the females for goat milk, and goats need to be pregnant to produce milk; they tend to have twins or triplets, leaving goat dairies with more males than they can currently handle.) If there were more demand for goat meat, farmers could more easily raise and ultimately slaughter these goats humanely.
  2. Goat is Good For You
    Goat meat is lower in total fat, cholesterol and saturated fat than meats like chicken, beef, pork and lamb; it also packs more iron, potassium and thiamine than these more popular American meats.
  3. Goat Tastes Great
    Those hesitant to try goat may not realize how many people love it. The New York Times says goat is the most widely consumed meat on the planet; America’s just starting to catch on. Some say it tastes like lean-beef-meets-lamb, and many compare the flavor to veal; those most familiar with the meat say you’ll just have to try it, because more than anything, goat tastes like goat.

We love the fact that all of the goats available for sale through Heritage Foods were pasture raised with no growth hormones or antibiotics, and slaughtered in Animal Welfare Approved or Certified Humane slaughterhouses.

Learn more about No Goat Left Behind and find participating farms and restaurants on the Heritage Foods website. Half and full goats are available for direct purchase on the site (scroll down on this page to find ordering info). Each order comes with goat recipes and a DVD introducing goat farms, farmers and processors, plus cooking demos.

Here’s a map of restaurants in NYC that sell Heritage Foods goat; a map is also available for the San Francisco area.

Have you ever tried goat? What’s the best goat dish you’ve ever eaten?