Salt-N-Pepa

Share
healthy potato chips
A whole lotta chips: almost $10 billion worth of potato chips are sold in the US annually.

Updated Jul 5, 2017 @ 1:42 pm

We really can’t sugarcoat this one: Potato chips aren’t a health food.

That said, when those potato-chips-necessary moments do strike, we will now be reaching for Jackson’s Honest Chips.

Fried in non-GMO organic coconut oil Jackson’s Honest Chips ($5 for 5 ounces) are clean tasting, robust and totally delicious. Megan and Scott Reamer call their chips a “what you see is what you get” product. For their classic variety, organic non-GMO potatoes are fried in coconut oil and sprinkled with sea salt. Other varieties include salt and vinegar, sweet potato and a kicky mango chile-lime version.

Coconut oil is a minimally processed oil, high in that good saturated fat you probably keep reading about (read more here). It is also rich in lauric acid and ideal for frying because of its stability at high temperatures.

Founders of Honest Chips
The family behind Jackson’s Honest Chips: Scott and Megan reamer with their kids.

The Reamer’s even fry according to the seasons. When the organic heirloom sweet potato harvest runs out, you’ll have to wait until the fall crop rolls in for a new batch. Lucky for us, that’s just about now.

The story behind these chips is an emotional one. Shortly after the Reamer’s first son, Jackson, turned two, he gradually lost all of his motor skills. As the couple criss-crossed the country visiting specialists and searching for answers, they also radically changed their diet. “After my husband and I recognized how important a ‘good fat’ diet was to Jackson’s health, we immediately replaced all the industrialized, highly processed polyunsaturated vegetable oils in our house. We started cooking exclusively with coconut oil, lard, tallow, palm oil, unrefined olive oil or unpasteurized butter,” says Megan.

The chips may have been born in their home kitchen (where they like to dip the sweet potato chips in melted chocolate) in Crested Butte, Colorado, but the Reamer’s see the chips today as more than a family-owned business: “It’s a movement to re-introduce healthy fats into the food chain,” they say.