Clean Habits: Moby

Our chat with this vegan singer-songwriter

Little Pine restaurant owned by Moby
Moby and Chef Anne Thornton in the kitchen of their upcoming restaurant, Little Pine.

Updated Jul 4, 2017 @ 5:58 pm

Singer-songwriter Moby has worn many hats throughout his career: DJ, photographer, book editor and now, Los Angeles restaurateur. Later this summer, the LA resident will be opening Little Pine—a vegan restaurant serving comforting dishes like mushroom leek pot pie and roasted cauliflower “steak”—in Silver Lake with chef Anne Thornton in the kitchen.

A vegan for 28 years, Moby—who initially stopped eating animal products because of empathy for his cat—strives to spread awareness of the diet’s health and environmental benefits. Read on for his thoughts on plant-based eating and planet-conscious living.

What inspires you to maintain a vegan diet?

When I was growing up, I had the same terrible American diet that everybody had. I ate Frosted Flakes for breakfast, bologna sandwiches for lunch, Burger King for snacks and meatloaf for dinner. The more I found out about the way my diet affected my health, the environment, and climate change, it reinforced my desire to eat vegan.

How do you stay fit? 

I live by Griffith Park so I go hiking six days a week. I do yoga five or six days a week and do tai chi and ride a bike every now and then.

Watch Moby talk about why he is vegan.

What’s a typical day of eating like for you? 

Every morning, I have the same breakfast, which is what I call the “mother of all smoothies.” It has bananas, berries, flax seeds, fresh turmeric, parsley, broccoli, mixed greens like chard and kale, DHA oil and ginger. For dinner, my favorite, easiest meal is what I call “kimchi pasta fagioli” (pasta with beans, olive oil, and kimchi made with ginger, cabbage, daikon and carrot).

How do you stay balanced and healthy while working in the music industry?

When I first started touring in the late ’80s and early ’90s, being a vegan was really challenging, especially in Eastern Europe or South America. But now, the world has really changed. A lot of conventional chefs who cook with meat and dairy are happy to make vegan food. Some of the best vegan meals I’ve had have been in conventional restaurants.

How does sustainability play a role in your life and in the upcoming restaurant?

I just tore up all my grass, put down drip irrigation and planted a bunch of native drought-tolerant plants. The restaurant will very much be an extension of my own principles of sustainability. It will be 100 percent organic.

Little Pine
2870 Rowena Ave., Los Angeles
littlepinerestaurant.com