How to Make Spaghetti Squash (So it Doesn’t Taste Mushy and Watery)

Spaghetti squash

Updated Jan 26, 2020 @ 10:57 pm

By Jenn Fillenworth

Spaghetti squash seems to be one of those polarizing foods. You either love it or maybe you even hate it, but perhaps it’s because you have never really had a good recipe before. Spaghetti squash has so many delicious applications and it’s great for those people looking to boost their vegetable intake or eat more complex carbs (rather than refined carbs) as the base of their meal. The biggest complaint is the watery texture and bland taste. The biggest trick to solve both of those problems is to make sure you get as much moisture out of the squash as possible. This leads to a much better flavor and reduces the likeliness that your squash will turn to mush.

The Basics: Spaghetti Squash Preparation 101

To begin,let’s chat about how to prepare your spaghetti squash. The best way to prepare your spaghetti squash is by roasting it at 400 degrees for 30-45 minutes. First, cut your spaghetti squash in half lengthwise and remove the seeds from the interior with a spoon. Brush the inside of the spaghetti squash will olive oil then place it cut side down on a baking sheet. Poke a few holes in the back of the squash with a fork then pop it in the oven. When you remove the squash from the oven, let it cool until it’s cool to the touch. Then use a fork to begin pulling the strands away from the squash.

Before incorporating the spaghetti squash into any recipe, place it in a colander and gently press down with a paper towel. This will remove even more of the excess moisture in the squash.

Now let’s take a look at some delicious ways to use it:

Swap those Noodles for Squash

Before zucchini, carrot, or sweet potato noodles, spaghetti squash took over as the low carbohydrate alternative. The problem was, most recipes called for a jar of pasta sauce over top which didn’t add anything special or memorable. My favorite recipes always incorporate plenty of aromatics like garlic, onion, ginger and pairing it with fresh chopped herbs. A little bit of a nice aged cheese —like parmesan — is always a great way to bring in some richness and flavor. This recipe for garlic spaghetti squash has been in my weekly dinner rotation for years.

Get the recipe: Garlic Spaghetti Squash with Herbs

Stuff that Squash with your Favorite Fillings

Stuffed peppers have been my go-to for a while but recently I’ve been on the stuffed spaghetti squash kick. You can easily prep your stuffed spaghetti squash the same way by roasting the halves, but then add in your favorite fillings and re-bake for an additional 15-20 minutes to combine those flavors.

Let me see that Casserole

I just happen to be from the Midwest where the casserole reigns supreme, but for good reason! This one pan meal has become a staple for those chilly nights. There tends to be protein, vegetables, and usually a starchy component. Well, it turns out that spaghetti squash is a great base for any casserole dish. Simply use the colander and paper towel method to remove the excess moisture before combining with any of your other casserole ingredients. This one pan dish is going to make your life so much easier (and tastier).

Start your spaghetti squash casserole journey with this recipe: Spaghetti Squash Casserole